Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Editors for coding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    197
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default Editors for coding

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverleyh View Post
    I dont use Dreamweaver
    Which is other application you are using ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 307 Times in 305 Posts
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Usually Notepad++ http://notepad-plus-plus.org/ or PSPad http://www.pspad.com/en/ , or sometimes just plain old Notepad - it depends which computer I'm using.
    Focus on Function Web Design | Latest News RSS | Facebook | Twitter |
    Fast Edit (A flat file, PHP web page editor & CMS. Small, FREE, no database!) | Fast Edit BE (Snippet Manager) (Web content editor for multiple editable regions!) | Fast Apps |
    The only limit to creativity is imagination: JemCon.org

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    So.Cal
    Posts
    3,643
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked 517 Times in 503 Posts
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    other good editors (in no particular order): Gedit*, TextWrangler, or Komodo Edit*^.

    * cross-platform (Linux/Mac/Windows)
    ^ my current favorite - highly recommended!

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to traq For This Useful Post:

    letom (05-04-2013)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    197
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverleyh View Post
    Usually Notepad++ http://notepad-plus-plus.org/ or PSPad http://www.pspad.com/en/ , or sometimes just plain old Notepad - it depends which computer I'm using.
    @Beverley
    I am wondered, when hearing you are using notepad as your web editor. Can u explain the benefits of Notepad Editor over other major web editors and applications like M Dream ?

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 307 Times in 305 Posts
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    It might be worth splitting this topic into a new thread - hopefully a mod will advise. But to answer your question...

    For me, its just personal preference. There's the obvious benefit, in that a plain text editor is free - when I first learned HTML and CSS, it was while I was unable to work following a car crash, so I couldn't afford any fancy software. It also makes my work extremely portable - with Notepad being a default application on all Windows computers, it means I can start it up and work/troubleshoot from whichever computer I happen to be at, without installing anything, whether that's with a private freelance client, visiting another school as part of my main employment, troubleshooting a student's web project, visiting my dad or sitting at my own desk (I also make quick edits on iPhone via my web host's online plain text editor), I always have the facility to do what I need to do. Plain text editors are familiar and comfortable to me, particularly having started in DOS way back when. I also find more freedom in the code than a WYSIWYG application that tries to think for me - sometimes its like trying to direct a friend to make a cup of tea exactly how I like when I can make it myself, to my own taste, and feel much more satisfied because of it. Ha, ha

    I have used Dreamweaver briefly but mainly because it was installed on my computer at the start of my employment. I always switched to code-view to work though because that's how I prefer to work, so the enormity of the application just seemed pointless when a small, free tool was fit for purpose. When it came time for a reformat, I never bothered installing Dreamweaver again. The students use it in the ICT suites onsite, but much of the time it encourages them to over-rely on the WYSIWYG aspect, so when it doesn't behave as expected and they need help to fix or understand something, I split the view and work directly in the HTML/CSS so they can see how a code change affects the visuals in 'real time'. For those who continue their web projects outside of the classroom, I tend to point them towards a freebie called KompoZer http://www.kompozer.net/ so they can still use a WYSIWYG editor without breaking the bank.

    Dreamweaver has lots of benefits too though - industry standards compliant, lots of plugins to simplify workflow, templating features, and the huge organisation and community who support it. I haven't used it extensively so its hard to make a fair argument. For those who do use Dreamweaver and whizz through their workflow due to their expertise and familiarity with the software, then that's great, but for me, I prefer plain text, a stash of code-snippets and a few good books/websites to refer to (I'm loving SitePoint's 'HTML5 & CSS3 For The Real World')
    Focus on Function Web Design | Latest News RSS | Facebook | Twitter |
    Fast Edit (A flat file, PHP web page editor & CMS. Small, FREE, no database!) | Fast Edit BE (Snippet Manager) (Web content editor for multiple editable regions!) | Fast Apps |
    The only limit to creativity is imagination: JemCon.org

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 307 Times in 305 Posts
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    In addition to the plain text editor benefits I mentioned above (cost, portability and familiarity) I'll also add understanding and awareness.

    I think when you have to create/build a web template/layout yourself, it forces you to be more aware of the markup and CSS you use - how much of it you use (seperating markup and presentation) to avoid code-bloat, the order of elements/content (promoting an awareness of accessibility for search engines and screen readers) and structural markup hierarchy (increased awareness of correct element tags and effects on SEO - e.g. using an h1 tag to indicate the most important heading on the page rather than to increase font size)

    There's also the understanding of a web page structure - head and body and metadata, etc. When somebody is working within a visual web builder, especially when first starting out, its all too easy to ignore the prompt/field for a title or description - "if the page document is called 'about-us.htm' when its saved on my computer, surely that's title and description enough, right?". And as we know, this leads to a slew of 'untitled' search results in Google (if the pages are indeed lucky enough to be found with such vague title information). I'm not saying that everybody who uses a WYSIWYG builder forgets or ignores these things, its just that when you're concentrating on the visuals, it makes it easier to overlook the important, hidden parts in the background.

    WYSIWYG can be a good thing though, especially for convenience, but I'm more inclined to use a visual editor for formatting the actual text content of a web page of an established site design, usually within a CMS. It does make things easier for quickly formatting a list, breaking into new paragraphs, or making a few words bold or italic. Its also much easier to drag and drop in an image to help illustrate the text content. Its just that I prefer plain text for designing.

    This conveniently leads to my next point - an understanding and awareness of asset size. It has been my observation that students who work with plain text (or code-view) are typically more aware of the physical weight of images, media and scripts within their web pages and they'll make more effort to optimise/minimise and resize images prior to incorporating them into their design (no visual resizing) which leads to faster page loads.

    Another obstacle with WYSIWYG is that its harder to break in to PHP. Getting somebody who's learned web design visually to then break up their web layout into common files, ready for PHP includes, can be a bit of a challenge. Its harder to get them to see the benefits of using common files when they realise their design has been hacked into parts that don't transport easily back into their visual builder. It can be quite distressing for them. If they're happier in a plain text editor, the transition is much easier and they'll find dynamic scripting easier to incorporate too.
    Focus on Function Web Design | Latest News RSS | Facebook | Twitter |
    Fast Edit (A flat file, PHP web page editor & CMS. Small, FREE, no database!) | Fast Edit BE (Snippet Manager) (Web content editor for multiple editable regions!) | Fast Apps |
    The only limit to creativity is imagination: JemCon.org

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Beverleyh For This Useful Post:

    letom (05-04-2013)

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    197
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Useful post... All things you said are absolutely correct..

    If i am using Dreamweaver, i only look at the code section of web page not in GUI. If we are working in php. we need to spend our 99% percent of time to look at coding part only (not 99% can say 100%), if i want to include a DIV i call it in code not add it from GUI in DW. But the only problem of notepad is, the coding part is not catchy, all are in same black color. but in DW, php codes are starting with red, forms with yellow and as continue... this is catchy and it is an important thing needed in web editors, but the the notepad you are using have the facility stated ?
    Another important thing is we need to search a string, it can be easily find and replace with others by pressing Ctrl + f in DW...

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    197
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    For me, its just personal preference. There's the obvious benefit, in that a plain text editor is free - when I first learned HTML and CSS, it was while I was unable to work following a car crash, so I couldn't afford any fancy software. It also makes my work extremely portable - with Notepad being a default application on all Windows computers, it means I can start it up and work/troubleshoot from whichever computer I happen to be at, without installing anything, whether that's with a private freelance client, visiting another school as part of my main employment, troubleshooting a student's web project, visiting my dad or sitting at my own desk (I also make quick edits on iPhone via my web host's online plain text editor), I always have the facility to do what I need to do. Plain text editors are familiar and comfortable to me, particularly having started in DOS way back when. I also find more freedom in the code than a WYSIWYG application that tries to think for me - sometimes its like trying to direct a friend to make a cup of tea exactly how I like when I can make it myself, to my own taste, and feel much more satisfied because of it. Ha, ha
    Good...
    Fine...But when making a cup of tea only we include, Sugar, coffee, & some mix, if we direct to a friend he/she will also do in same way, but add these stuffs, high or less than us . At the same way The real thing is what we are adding and deducting in the application /coding, not using which editor.

    Anyway It would be nice if we pray Before do anything..Then crashes will not happen in our life, even if it is in our programming.. Have a great success in all your life.
    Last edited by letom; 05-04-2013 at 06:47 PM.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    1,970
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 307 Times in 305 Posts
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Yes, Notepad++, PSPad and the ones traq recommends, all have syntax highlighting, collapsing and easy find&replace features, plus more than one undo, so they are much better to use than the default Notepad application. Notepad++ also stores files in memory until you explicitly instruct it to close them, so even when you close the whole application and open it up 3 days later, it still has all of your files loaded in to different tabs where you can continue undoing and redoing from.

    Basic Notepad is just a handy fallback when you need to use it, but for daily development/design, its preferably to use an application with more features.
    Focus on Function Web Design | Latest News RSS | Facebook | Twitter |
    Fast Edit (A flat file, PHP web page editor & CMS. Small, FREE, no database!) | Fast Edit BE (Snippet Manager) (Web content editor for multiple editable regions!) | Fast Apps |
    The only limit to creativity is imagination: JemCon.org

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    197
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    You tell the best recommendation from that... Notepad++?

Similar Threads

  1. Text Editors
    By bluewalrus in forum Other
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-18-2009, 06:05 AM
  2. Resolved WYSIWYG Editors...
    By Nile in forum JavaScript
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-02-2009, 08:08 AM
  3. suggestions on html editors - open source
    By karunakarroyal in forum JavaScript
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-17-2008, 09:02 AM
  4. coding help please
    By smrpgx in forum JavaScript
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-15-2006, 02:47 PM
  5. Editors
    By Søren Chr. Sørensen in forum Dynamic Drive scripts help
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-09-2005, 02:11 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •