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Thread: Radio firsts for Christmas 2012 - songs of the season

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by djr33 View Post
    As for Australian, that's true. There are a few new vocabulary items, but mostly it's just the pronunciation, which I think is fun
    Goodaye mate

    Joking... There are actually very few Australians (at least that I know) that use any of those "Australian phrases".
    But there are a lot of different pronunciations... Out of curiousity, does anyone say "e-moo" instead of "e-myou"?

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    It's G'day Keyboard
    A very large amount of people (not just Australians) say "mate".
    It's particularly interesting to listen to "stereotypical" Australians speak (definitely not stereotypical and usually not Australan).

    As to the shows on in Australia, they're playing a couple of James Bond movies each Saturday (goldfinger and thunderball last weekend)
    "Most good programmers do programming not because they expect to get paid or get adulation by the public, but because it is fun to program." - Linus Torvalds
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie1227 View Post
    It's G'day Keyboard
    A very large amount of people (not just Australians) say "mate".
    It's particularly interesting to listen to "stereotypical" Australians speak (definitely not stereotypical and usually not Australan).

    As to the shows on in Australia, they're playing a couple of James Bond movies each Saturday (goldfinger and thunderball last weekend)
    I do so love it when people try to sound Australian
    As to the Bond movies, they're movies?
    You know they're playing the Lord of the Rings at the moment... WOOT WOOT!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by keyboard1333 View Post
    As to the Bond movies, they're movies?
    ...... What else would they be?
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    We were talking about tv sho... never mind

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    I say "e-moo" for emu. But that probably varies by dialect. People in England probably say "e-myu", and some Americans too. Just my guess.

    A few words that I've noticed include "arvo" for afternoon, g'day, and "pull up" meaning "to stop" (in other dialects it means "arrive" but not really stop-- in a TV show I heard "The train pulled up just in time [to avoid hitting people]"). Plus "mate" of course.

    And I also heard "tomorrow week", which I've never heard in America.



    I also have no idea about this one, but I heard "Even blind Charlie can see [that]..." meaning "that's obvious!". I've never heard it elsewhere. But we do say "even a blind man can see that". (Of course I'm ignoring political correctness here. I just heard it on a show! Haha.)

    Is there some "Charlie" in particular, or is that just a phrase that's out there?


    I do so love it when people try to sound Australian
    That can go both ways, though! Australians are becoming more and more common in American TV/movies. Sometimes they do a good job. Other times... they don't

    The series Roswell has a great example-- and what's funny is that the whole time I believe she was pretending to really be American, while it was obvious she wasn't.

    An interesting example is House M.D. The character "Chase" (one of the assistant doctors) is clearly Australian, and he's Australian in the story (which makes sense!). (At the same time, Hugh Laurie is actually British and is completely indistinguishable from the Americans.)
    But then the same actor is now on a show called "Chicago Fire" and he does a very good job of sounding American. He convinces me, and that's hard to do. It's impressive.

    (Actually, the girl who was in Roswell was later in the movie "I am Number Four", an entertaining but silly film, and in that she appeared less Australian, but still wasn't convincingly American-- it was, I think, about half and half, some sentences American, others Australian-- that's confusing.)
    Last edited by djr33; 12-17-2012 at 02:40 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by djr33 View Post
    I also have no idea about this one, but I heard "Even blind Charlie can see [that]..." meaning "that's obvious!". I've never heard it elsewhere. But we do say "even a blind man can see that". (Of course I'm ignoring political correctness here. I just heard it on a show! Haha.)

    Is there some "Charlie" in particular, or is that just a phrase that's out there?
    I've never actually heard that...

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    Quote Originally Posted by djr33 View Post
    A few words that I've noticed include "arvo" for afternoon, g'day, and "pull up" meaning "to stop" (in other dialects it means "arrive" but not really stop-- in a TV show I heard "The train pulled up just in time [to avoid hitting people]"). Plus "mate" of course.

    And I also heard "tomorrow week", which I've never heard in America.
    We use things like, "Friday week" for example, and "yesterday week", but I haven't heard "tomorrow week".
    I also have no idea about this one, but I heard "Even blind Charlie can see [that]..." meaning "that's obvious!". I've never heard it elsewhere. But we do say "even a blind man can see that". (Of course I'm ignoring political correctness here. I just heard it on a show! Haha.)

    Is there some "Charlie" in particular, or is that just a phrase that's out there?
    I know a lot of people who say "blind Freddie" (not Charlie), however people also use "tail-end Charlie", (in reference to the tail gunners in Lancaster bombers during the war, who were nicknamed that, but is used in reference to someone lagging behind)
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    Oops... I meant Freddie. I couldn't remember and I saw something on the internet when I searched for "Charlie".
    Hm... what about "blind Freddie" then?



    As for "week", I'm pretty sure it was "tomorrow week". But either way, seems the same as "yesterday week" or "Friday week"... what does that mean, exactly? Is it 7 days from that point? So "yesterday week" means from 8 days to 1 day ago? And "Friday week" means "Friday, and one week after"?
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    Quote Originally Posted by djr33 View Post
    Oops... I meant Freddie. I couldn't remember and I saw something on the internet when I searched for "Charlie".
    Hm... what about "blind Freddie" then?
    Well, that's what people I know say.
    As for "week", I'm pretty sure it was "tomorrow week". But either way, seems the same as "yesterday week" or "Friday week"... what does that mean, exactly? Is it 7 days from that point? So "yesterday week" means from 8 days to 1 day ago? And "Friday week" means "Friday, and one week after"?
    Basically yes, but "tomorrow week" doesn't really have a ring to it.
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