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Thread: Help on opening multiple iframe windows

  1. #11
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    I believe I understand why it's not working for me, but am not entirely sure what to do about it. iWeb publishes the snippets as external files which the main page calls upon. If I manually remove my page from the server after publishing and add the html directly to the page and then put it back on the server it will work. The problem with this approach (aside from positioning, which I believe I can resolve) is that everytime I make a minor edit to the page, it will break it and require me to go through the process of post publishing edit again.

  2. #12
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    The simple answer: don't use iWeb. It's limited. Or, if you do want to use it, just be happy with what it does for you.

    "WYSIWYG" (preview-based) editors are inherently limited and tend to generate bad code. They do work for certain purposes, but they're not ideal.

    It can feel like a big leap to start writing the code yourself, but it's a good idea if you want full control.

    Especially for a program like iWeb with very specific options, you're going to be limited. For something a little more flexible, like Dreamweaver, you'll still face some problems, but usually it won't get in the way of you editing the code yourself. With iWeb (and I don't know too much about it to be honest) my impression is that it will actually restrict you from making certain modifications, at least (as you've found) if you want to go back and edit it with iWeb later.
    Daniel - Freelance Web Design | <?php?> | <html>| espa˝ol | Deutsch | italiano | portuguŕs | catalÓ | un peu de franšais | some knowledge of several other languages: I can sometimes help translate here on DD | Linguistics Forum

  3. #13
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    You are indeed correct, I have already learned this.

    It isn't so much the limitations (or more likely correctly, the hoops you need to jump through) that are a problem, I have found that most things can be worked around in iWeb with a little patience. The basic issue I have with iWeb is that it is extremely difficult to optimise your site (perhaps impossible), patience just bugs me, slow sites bug my customers and that's a bigger problem.

    I have taken the opportunity of taking the 30 day free trial for creative cloud and am currently evaluating DW, but I'm also aware that a replacement for iWeb (EasyWeb) may be released at the WWDC and I'd like to take a look at that before making any decisions. However, I now have my old site to maintain, the new one I've started and am most of the way through and two new applications to look at. My old site is poor and I'd like to think my new site is a little better, but ultimately I want to make a better site that can be updated with producing simple xml files, so that my staff can do it instead of me.

    Before I can do that, I have a lot to learn. As a surveyor rather than a web designer I feel like I'm looking at quantum physics whilst I've only just discovered the atom, so for now I'm looking to finish what I've started (www.gartside.co.uk/Old/Welcome.html - (while it's in an 'old folder, it's actually new and will be moved when appropriate) and spend whatever time it takes to learn things properly.

    I hope this makes sense, thank you for your advice, it is good advice.

  4. #14
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    iWeb is easy, and therefore limited, including everything you've noticed like no ability to optimize anything. If you find yourself working around it, then that's defeating the point-- it's no longer easy, and there will be some things that are either very difficult to work around, or are impossible in iWeb.

    A program like Dreamweaver is better, but I still wouldn't really recommend it. The good news there is that you'd have full control of your code (except for a few features where it would try to manage your site-- I'd suggest turning those off if I were you). But it would still end up, in many ways, only giving the illusion of helping you-- again, making it "easy" while actually causing fundamental problems-- mostly that it writes bad code and teaches you to rely on it to write HTML rather than learning it yourself.

    All you need is a plain text editor, like Notepad. We've had a number of discussions of good editors, and some useful features are code highlighting, built in FTP, and displaying line numbers. They all share the fact that you'd write all of the code by hand. Almost everything else is superfluous, at least once you reach a certain level.

    It isn't the worst idea to have some kind of WYSIWYG editor around for things you don't want to type out by hand (perhaps you want to edit a very long passage of text and want to make certain things bold), but even then I'd probably recommend using find/replace to fix the code that is generated. (I'd love to find a convenient text-only editor that allowed quick editing like that-- the preview isn't really the helpful part-- it's the time it takes to type code repetitively.)

    Whatever WYSIWYG editor you use next, it will still have some problems. It's up to you. Maybe you don't need perfect code and complete flexibility, and you just don't have time to learn to write it all by hand. That's fine, as long as it fits your purposes. So maybe check out whatever follows iWeb, but it will improve the situation, not fix it. iWeb is, among the WYSIWYG editors, pretty bad, though. It's easy, but that's part of why it's bad.

    (To be clear, I have nothing against "easy" programs. I do some filmmaking as well, and I tend to use iMovie for basic things because it's fast, then I switch to Final Cut Pro for serious projects because it's more powerful. Which is better? FCP, no question. But is iMovie useless? No, just limited and for simpler things.)


    Finally, another reason to write code by hand is for things that can't be seen in a preview-based editor. Once you get into any extras like Javascript or server-side languages (like PHP), HTML will be the output, not the underlying code. Then you'll do everything by hand, out of necessity. You can add some extras here and there while still working in a WYSIWYG editor, but (especially beyond Javacript) you'll hit the limits pretty quickly.
    Daniel - Freelance Web Design | <?php?> | <html>| espa˝ol | Deutsch | italiano | portuguŕs | catalÓ | un peu de franšais | some knowledge of several other languages: I can sometimes help translate here on DD | Linguistics Forum

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    absolute beginner (05-17-2013)

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