Blog Comments

  1. Beverleyh's Avatar
    Thanks for the feedback

    I guess the impossibility of clicking on items of the individual external pages (in the show) is intentional?
    Yes, the "mask" is always present, but transparent, so this acts as a blocking mechanism for the framed page content. The idea is that the admin (the person triggering the hover menu) wouldn't need to interact with the pages that are showing - just the SiteShow hover menu, to test the schedule via a computer. The SiteShow is being displayed to all other 'users' via a TV screen where interaction isn't necessary.

    The way you reveal new web pages into an iframe has a disadvantage, though. When we let the show go on for a while, then new entries are constantly added to the browser's history, which makes it hard to go back to a preceding window via the browser's back button. We're captured in the show, so to speak. Couldn't you make it so that new iframed pages are added via replace, not via href?
    If you wanted to display the SiteShow via a website then yes, the replace() method might be a better choice, but this is for display via a TV (no controls) so the browser history isn't an issue in the intended context. All users (except the admin) are looking at the output via a mounted TV and have no way of interacting - they look but don't touch
  2. molendijk's Avatar
    That's very nice. I guess the impossibility of clicking on items of the individual external pages (in the show) is intentional?
    The way you reveal new web pages into an iframe has a disadvantage, though. When we let the show go on for a while, then new entries are constantly added to the browser's history, which makes it hard to go back to a preceding window via the browser's back button. We're captured in the show, so to speak. Couldn't you make it so that new iframed pages are added via replace, not via href?