PDA

View Full Version : IE9 Issue with



thersh4114
01-03-2013, 11:03 PM
1) Script Title: AnyLink JS Drop Down Menu v2.3

2) Script URL (on DD): http://www.dynamicdrive.com/dynamicindex1/dropmenuindex.htm

3) Describe problem: This script works great on all browsers except for IE9. Any ideas how to fix it, the menus don't show up at all in IE9.

here is the sample

ie-proofs.com/advanced-engraving.com/index.php

thanks

jscheuer1
01-03-2013, 11:18 PM
I only see one menu in any browser. That's when I hover over 'Products'. That menu works fine in IE 9 here. However there are some errors on the page as relates to this script and these show up in any browser as well

timhersh
01-04-2013, 02:40 PM
I only see one menu in any browser. That's when I hover over 'Products'. That menu works fine in IE 9 here. However there are some errors on the page as relates to this script and these show up in any browser as well

Thanks, that is so weird though, I can't get it to show up on any computer that has IE9.

jscheuer1
01-05-2013, 05:42 PM
It's possible that an earlier version of the page did have a problem in those browsers and that now it's cached. Try clearing the browser cache and refreshing the page. Make sure to give IE 9 a chance by rolling over the entire 'Project' item slowly.

Now it's also possible that those IE 9 browsers you're testing in have one or more settings that prevent the script from working. This can be particularly true if these browsers are on an administrated network as is often the case at a business, internet café or school. And/or that third party utilities are blocking it. Some anti-virus/anti-malware programs have been known to do that. I believe I've even heard of rare cases where other programs can block scripts in IE. This all started with IE 5 when they instituted Active-X controls for special effects. These could be exploited to hack the computer, so many administrators turned them off, breaking many scripts. Later the Active-X controls used for special effects were made safe, but that's a distinction that is lost on some administrators. The situation became worse with Vista and IE 8, where the OS working with it's own firewall and/or third party programs could block scripts.

Generally it's pretty rare, though it's always a good idea to use scripts that either aren't essential to the web page or that can degrade gracefully when not supported. That's an issue not only for IE, but other browsers as well. No script can be guaranteed to work in all browsers, and the user might have javascript disabled or unavailable (as in the case of a screen reader for the disabled, folks using a network that block scripts, etc.) anyway.