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davidjmorin
03-13-2008, 05:44 PM
is there a way to require my copywrite info at the footer and if it is eraased then it will disable the entire script?

boogyman
03-13-2008, 05:47 PM
no there is not

Nile
03-13-2008, 05:58 PM
Well you could. But then they could just delete that part too.

Jas
03-13-2008, 06:53 PM
Effectively, no. Any attempt could easily be changed, no matter how hard you try. A good solution might be to somehow embed the copyright in a graphic so that, in order to remove or change it, the user would have to remake the graphic. It can be done, yes, but it's harder then changing text.

Legally, you can also require that it be there. If you own it, and someone else tries to call it theirs by taking out your copyright, that's plagiarism. ;) I'm not too sure how you can monitor that, though. . .

The bottom line is, if your sharing a script, don't get too attached to it.

boogyman
03-13-2008, 08:19 PM
Legally, you can also require that it be there. If you own it, and someone else tries to call it theirs by taking out your copyright, that's plagiarism. ;) I'm not too sure how you can monitor that, though. . .

The bottom line is, if your sharing a script, don't get too attached to it.

it is very hard to prosecutor web plagarism

Jas
03-13-2008, 10:11 PM
That would depend on what precautions you take. For example, if you register your website and it's content with a copyright office, I don't think you'll have too much trouble. The main problem lies in proving that you own the content, and registering it would take care of that. Of course, the service is not free and it varies based on your location. (You can also "prove" that you created it first by mailing a copy of it to yourself and leaving the envelope sealed, but that hardly ever works in court, and I think it has never worked in the U.S. to date.)

And I repeat, for emphasis:

The bottom line is, if your sharing a script, don't get too attached to it.
And that goes for everything you put on the internet. Even Microsoft has things stolen from them, although I don't know why you would be so mental as to do that-- they probably have an entire law firm just waiting to prosecute people who steal their stuff online :p

boogyman
03-14-2008, 01:09 PM
Even Microsoft has things stolen from them

and they steal from others... aka their original GUI from apple...

but anywho... my opinion is just add a disclaimer to the page asking someone to credit you where it's due. Making a big fuss about not allowing them to get at something when no matter what you do can always be worked around, you will see alot better results.

Jas
03-14-2008, 03:11 PM
and they steal from others... aka their original GUI from apple...
Heh, no debate there. :D (But we could go in circles about who stole what from whom in the computer industry.) I was talking about web content, though.


but anywho... my opinion is just add a disclaimer to the page asking someone to credit you where it's due. Making a big fuss about not allowing them to get at something when no matter what you do can always be worked around, you will see alot better results.

This is very true. If you make a big deal about it, like begging "Please don't steal it!" people will probably steal it anyway. Also, if you say "Leave my name on line one, three, seven, eighteen, thirty-five. . . . Don't change this. . . Leave this alone . . . . " People will ignore you again, because your restrictions are seen as unreasonable. The best policy would simply be to be reasonable in your requests. Take DynamicDrive; All they ask for is a simple credit in the header. No one finds that an unfair price, so they generally do it.

davidjmorin
03-18-2008, 03:33 PM
well i know that in vbulletin if you remove there stuff at the bottom it diables the entire forum. how do they do that. I would like to do it to a site that i created for a company.

Leafy
03-19-2008, 08:13 PM
If there was a way to compile the scripts, then sure. But there isn't as far as I know, because PHP is an interpreted language...

Jas
03-20-2008, 07:07 PM
You could encrypt it, unencrypt it, and then execute it. But there are many problems with that:

Users won't be able to make modifications (at best this will upset them)
The page will load slower
Anyone who was really bent on getting the code wouldn't have too much trouble
it would be hard to create the process needed for the two way encryption, and then there is the execution to think about

Other then that, there is nothing that I can think of that would even phase a user. Perhaps vbulletin does have something, but if it's in PHP, it can't be very effective.

thetestingsite
03-20-2008, 09:33 PM
I've ran into forum software that did this as well (AEF I believe). Basically, there were two items that made it possible (and tough to find if you are in-experienced with PHP). The first was a variable named $copyright which had all of the information for the copyright notice. Then in the main initiation function, there was a function call to strrev (http://php.net/strrev) and if the copyright variable was changed to something other than what it originally was, then the script would die. Pretty simple to go about this. Simply place this in a config file (or the script itself):



$copyright = 'Hello World!';


Then place a function that executes on every page like so:



if ($copyright != strrev('!dlrow olleH')) {
die();
}


Hope this helps

Jas
03-21-2008, 03:31 AM
That's not a good solution:

if ($copyright != strrev('!dlrow olleH')) {
//die();
}
Even a brand new coder could figure that out. If they can figure out how to change the copyright, they can figure out how to add a comment or erase the line (especially since the function name is self explanatory :p).

Edit: and why use strrev? I would use binary or the crypt function or something.
I also had a though-- what if some one accidentally changed the case of a letter in the copyright? lol. "Oh no! What happened?!" :eek:

thetestingsite
03-21-2008, 02:07 PM
That's not a good solution:

if ($copyright != strrev('!dlrow olleH')) {
//die();
}
Even a brand new coder could figure that out. If they can figure out how to change the copyright, they can figure out how to add a comment or erase the line (especially since the function name is self explanatory :p).

Edit: and why use strrev? I would use binary or the crypt function or something.
I also had a though-- what if some one accidentally changed the case of a letter in the copyright? lol. "Oh no! What happened?!" :eek:

I was just pointing to a simple example that I had found when trying to change the copyright link to open a new window instead of opening in the current window. Every time I changed the variable, it would kill the script and show just a blank page. I then found this in their main initiation function. I wasn't encourgeing the OP to use this as a solution, but instead a simple example to go off of.

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-21-2008, 04:10 PM
I was just pointing to a simple example that I had found when trying to change the copyright link to open a new window instead of opening in the current window. Every time I changed the variable, it would kill the script and show just a blank page. I then found this in their main initiation function. I wasn't encourgeing the OP to use this as a solution, but instead a simple example to go off of.

Hope this helps.
And it's not a bad example. I am not slamming your code (Your a better coder then I am, no matter how you look at it :)).

The point is that, in scripting languages, it's not possible to effectively protect your script. The reason, as has been said already, is because the user can edit the source code. At best you can slow them, but, again, you'll never stop them unless you use a compiled language (and some people can still hack into that :(). If your worried about it getting stolen, it's probably best if you don't put it online.

EDIT: although the why use strrev question might have sounded like I disliked the code. I was-- and am-- curious why you chose that one. Simplicity?

thetestingsite
03-21-2008, 06:05 PM
EDIT: although the why use strrev question might have sounded like I disliked the code. I was-- and am-- curious why you chose that one. Simplicity?


Again, the only reason I chose strrev was due to that being the case for Advanced Electron Forums (AEF). After thinking about it a little, I would try to make a call to a remote location which would have some kind of license/copyright code; however, as has been said before, this will only slow the person trying to change the code instead of actually stopping them.

Jas
03-23-2008, 03:09 AM
You know what, though, I just had an idea thanks to your comment, thetestingsite.

Problem: Pulling information from elsewhere means they can't edit it. The problem that remains is that they can take out the bit of code that would stop the processing. (i.e. the die() function)

Solution: If you make the code in some way dependent on some outside source-- say for a MySQL database or a few PHP pages-- you might be able to prevent changes. For example, you could give the user the files which pertain to the settings of the script, while the rest of the script stays on your server (for example, you can keep an algorithm for an encryption process on your server, rather then giving it to users). The script is then executed form the users website through your webserver. The downside is, of course, a huge loss in bandwidth for you. But anyway, it would certainly work :)

I would not recommend doing this, and I doubt it's what your looking for, but it would certainly work.
Anyway, I just though I would share that. Other people might have already thought of it, but it just know came to me. :p

williamstam
03-25-2008, 06:48 AM
once again you get the problem of it being code... to prohibit it all you do is view the page and click view source.. take the source and paste it in an editor... bingo... change it as you want... for the remote calls.. here in SA we have a thing called "mxit" its an application that runs on cellphones to enable chat like msn.. anyways.. the main script makes a call to the servers to load another script... all you do is open the first script. find the url of where its going. download it. edit the first script with a new location. and you limit the web trafic. :P

so basicaly... if you code it.. dont get attatched

Jas
03-25-2008, 04:02 PM
You're thinking client side (like javascript), whereas we're talking server side (PHP, the source code of which is invisible to anyone except the server it's hosted from, unless you hack in). At no point should the clients computer directly contact the other server (hopefully).


Client==Website's Server
||
Second Server
(Client goes to website, website gets output from second server, website server sends info back to client).
Not

// Website's Server
client {{
\\ Second Server
(Client pulls info from both servers)

But yes, if you put it online, be prepared to see it copied, modified or otherwise stolen. I guess that's what we get for having so much freedom on the internet-- having no one monitor it has to have some disadvantages, right?