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Jas
03-03-2008, 08:54 PM
In addition to my other question in this section of the forums, I also would like to know how I actually go about setting up the web server-- that is, how do I get it online? I already have XAMPP installed on a LINUX (Ubuntu) OS, and I am probably going to buy the domain name from godaddy, unless you have another suggestion.

So what do I do from there? How do I go from localhost to www.mysite.com?

(I googled it, but ironically I got a lot of information for WinXP servers, and other information that doesn't help me.)

Thanks,
Jas

Master_script_maker
03-03-2008, 11:03 PM
get a static ip, buy a domain name and point it to your ip. if you don't have a static ip go to http://www.dyndns.com/

Jas
03-04-2008, 12:34 AM
get a static ip, buy a domain name and point it to your ip. if you don't have a static ip go to http://www.dyndns.com/
I need more information. How do I point the domain name to the IP, for starters?

thetestingsite
03-04-2008, 01:17 AM
When you purchase your domain, you will be given access to a DNS "Control Panel". use this to point your (sub)domains to their specific IP addresses.

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-04-2008, 03:11 AM
Thanks. Sounds simple enough :) What do I do with http://www.dyndns.com/?

Twey
03-04-2008, 05:55 AM
I already have XAMPP installed on a LINUX (Ubuntu) OSI suspect that the reason you got a lot of XP info is that nobody uses XAMPP or similar "Apache for dummies" packages on Linux. Your package manager should do everything for you.

Jas
03-04-2008, 04:56 PM
I suspect that the reason you got a lot of XP info is that nobody uses XAMPP or similar "Apache for dummies" packages on Linux. Your package manager should do everything for you.
Beg your pardon?
What's a package manager?

boxxertrumps
03-04-2008, 11:50 PM
What's a package manager?
Ok, died a little...

To answer the question, synaptic.

Jas
03-05-2008, 02:05 AM
Ok, died a little...
To answer the question, synaptic.
That tells me as much as twey's post. I don't mean to sound rude, but In terms of LINUX, I am a first grader--I know nothing about the system tools or available tools beyond what windows has in common with linux-- so please give me some information that I can understand. Talk to me like I'm three if you have to. Again, I don't want to sound rude, but you guys aren't giving me much to work with.

thetestingsite
03-05-2008, 02:29 AM
Well, you could look through these websites for more information on Linux:

http://www.howtoforge.com/
http://ubuntuforums.org/
http://www.ubuntu.com/

Also, depending on your version of Ubuntu, you could look through this search result for more info on how to set it up for a webserver.

http://www.google.com/search?q=howtoforge+ubuntu&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-06-2008, 02:36 AM
Thank you! I have a feeling I'll be checking that stuff out a lot over the next few months. In any case, what is it that I do with http://www.dyndns.com/? After that, I should be set. :)

thetestingsite
03-06-2008, 02:34 PM
Read this info here: http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/custom/

Long story short, you purchase the domain, pay for the dyndns services, then you have to update your dynamic IP address everytime you connect (or at least, every time it changes). You're better off just asking your ISP for a static IP address and (if needed), pay that one-time fee so that you can just use your default DNS control panel whenever you purchase the domain.

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-06-2008, 04:53 PM
I'll see if I can switch to static. But, in case I can't, is that the same thing http://freedns.afraid.org/ ? Because afraid.org is supposedly free.

thetestingsite
03-06-2008, 05:07 PM
It should work, but of course you still have to update the information whenever your ip changes (which can be a hassle if you forget about it, or whatever other case). Something that I failed to mention is that if you want to host on your own connection, check with your ISP to make sure that it does not go against their TOS as it could cause you to lose your connection altogether or they can charge you "penalty fees" for it.

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-08-2008, 02:52 AM
Thanks again! I hadn't thought of the TOS.

What ISP's would be good for hosting a site? What do people "typically" use? (loosely speaking.)

thetestingsite
03-08-2008, 02:57 PM
Usually, you would get the bandwidth from a Tier 1 or Tier 2 (at the very least) provider. That way you are basically right there on the internet backbone. Also, this can get very expensive (line costs, monthly fees, bandwidth allocation fees [not usually, but I have run into this one before], etc). Other than that, your best bet would be to host with a company that is already set up (as to not have to worry about your connection speeds to your home server or any downtime that you may have due to power issues, internet connection issues, etc.).

Hope this helps.

Jas
03-10-2008, 03:18 AM
Thanks again. This is really helpful information! :) Can you give me an example of an ISP that meets that criteria?

tfit
03-13-2008, 07:09 PM
Jas,

It's not clear to me if you want to host yourself our use a hosting provider! I use dyndns and you don't have to buy a domainname for your testing. If you want a "full" domainname and host it yourself you can use dyndns. Especially if you have a changing ip number. If you find a hostingservice they will most likely handle your dns service.
Hope this helps.

Jas
03-14-2008, 01:00 AM
Hmm. Your right-- I don't think I ever actually said that I am trying to host it myself. It was kind of implied, though, I thought.

Anyway, right now I am looking into the ISP thing. I can't seem to find one that meets the criteria thetestingsite gave me.

Master_script_maker
03-14-2008, 03:32 AM
http://www.google.com/search?q=ISP+provider+for+web+servers&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Jas
03-14-2008, 04:01 PM
Thanks, but google is the first thing I checked. Everything returns stuff like (first result on your seach):

Internet service provider offers affordable ISP services to both the Arizona and US market with web hosting, highspeed Internet connection and a host of ...
In other words, they all say high speed internet + web hosting, rather than high speed internet for web hosting.

I thought I was pretty good at searching for things on the internet, but with billions of web hosts out there, it's hard to filter them all out-- especially in this search :p

BLiZZaRD
03-14-2008, 10:22 PM
Have a little read this may be of some help (http://www.webmasterworld.com/forum48/2117.htm)

Jas
03-15-2008, 05:20 AM
Thanks. That's a great thread, but I still don't know what good ISP options there are. I have the criteria, but no examples.

BTW: about how much might the ISP cost on a monthly/yearly basis? (That is, how much should I expect to pay? I imagine it costs more then your average household high speed ISP)

tfit
03-16-2008, 08:59 AM
Jas,

If you really want to push and challenge your knowledge you want to host it yourself. There is so much more you have to learn when you do it yourself. But all you learn will stick with you. And my first advice would be to start with monitoring everything what goes inside and outside of your network.

Master_script_maker
03-25-2008, 07:37 PM
http://www.diywebserver.com/

Jas
03-26-2008, 03:45 AM
The site mentioned SBC Ameritech static DSL, but didn't give any info on it. I tried googling, but came up with nothing. . . .

I have a bit of criteria that I am looking for in an ISP, and so far I am having a hard time getting past number two-- let alone three. So, here is the criteria. I need an ISP that:

Is static
Will let me host a server
Will allow a small file-sharing kind of website (in other words, a good amount of upstream and downstream)
Is fast and very reliable
Is as cheap as posible
Comes from a trusted company

Any more help and/or advice would be amazing right now. My website is ready to be put online, but I need the right ISP first. :(