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jass
12-04-2007, 10:21 AM
After doing disk clean up on the c drive, is it still necessary to go to the local broowser to delete Files, Cookies, Hidtory etc?:confused:

Thank you for your advice.

djr33
12-04-2007, 10:37 AM
Depends. It's good to even reformat your windows computer every 3 months or so. So, sure, deleting more won't hurt. It isn't specifically required, so it's hard to answer your question yes/no.
As for whether that deletes them automatically, I really don't know. I haven't used that in a long time. I don't think so, or at least don't believe it's required as an option.

jscheuer1
12-04-2007, 10:53 AM
Reformatting every three months is extreme and completely unnecessary unless you can't maintain your installation. A computer, once set up to your satisfaction and properly maintained should never require reformatting.

Some, if not all of the operations for deleting browser specific files are available in the disk clean up utility. Any that are, and that you used while in the disk clean up utility, need not be repeated in the browser itself.

Keep your system updated (live update), defragmented (only when needed), and free of viruses and malware. If you are in the habit of installing and uninstalling programs frequently, clear out the registry of any unneeded entries periodically using a good utility for that, and (only if disk space is at a premium or you are having problems re-installing or updating a program) clear away old unused application data from the documents and settings folder's sub-folders.

jass
12-04-2007, 11:56 AM
How often should the disk defragmentation takes place?
Is once every month too often?

I installed and uninstalled quite a number of programs in the past. I thought uninstalling the program would have deleted all the entires of the progams installed!
How do I clear out the registry of any unneeded entries /clear away old unused application data from the documents and settings folder's sub-folders?

I would appreciate your advice.

boogyman
12-04-2007, 01:48 PM
How often should the disk defragmentation takes place?
Is once every month too often?

I installed and uninstalled quite a number of programs in the past. I thought uninstalling the program would have deleted all the entires of the progams installed!
How do I clear out the registry of any unneeded entries /clear away old unused application data from the documents and settings folder's sub-folders?

I would appreciate your advice.

there is an analysis tool in the defragment home screen, if you hit that and it said it can be defragmented well then go for it if you want.

if you use add/remove programs menu it should take care of the registry information.

jscheuer1
12-04-2007, 04:56 PM
there is an analysis tool in the defragment home screen, if you hit that and it said it can be defragmented well then go for it if you want.

if you use add/remove programs menu it should take care of the registry information.

That's right for defragment. Defragmenting, when required, usually results in improved performance. The add/remove programs menu information isn't always complete though, so using it may not even be possible. Even when it is, it doesn't always fully clean the registry, much less the applications data folder's sub-folders.

Cleaning the registry manually is only for very advanced users. PC-Tools makes a decent commercial product for this purpose. I believe there are some free utilities around for that. But, since I haven't had much need of them lately, I cannot comment on their individual suitability at the moment. I can say that Spybot Search and Destroy has some fairly useful utilities for the registry in advanced mode, but care should be taken in using it (as mentioned in its documentation) as should be with any registry tool. Ideally, backups should be made first.

There are applications data folders, under the various users in documents and settings. Under these are the various applications and their data. As I said, unless disk space is at a premium (you won't recover much of that here anyway*), or you are having problems with uninstalling or reinstalling, (and, I might add, under certain circumstances, if you need to tweak a program) there isn't any real call to mess with these. If you are unfamiliar with what to do here, check for resources on the web, especially as regards the particular program you are having trouble with.

The registry and the applications data are performance issues. If the computer is performing fast enough and not crashing a lot (it is unlikely that messing with the registry or applications data will improve the performance over what it was when the computer was new, and some minor loss in performance is to be expected with the addition of programs), don't worry about them. But if performance is an issue check first to make sure that viruses, trojans, other malware, and even hardware problems are not the true culprits.

* If disk space is the main issue, don't worry about the registry or the applications data. Look for saved update files that have already been used and that are no longer required, and get rid of those, as well as any large files like images, audio or video that you made or saved that you no longer need or that could be stored somewhere else than on your hard drive.

djr33
12-04-2007, 10:16 PM
Reformatting every three months is extreme and completely unnecessary unless you can't maintain your installation.
If you don't use your computer much, maybe, or if you really are all that good at stopping your computer from getting messy.

However, with every installation on every computer I've owned (including non Windows OS systems, though specifically those) has gotten somewhat messy within 3 months. Perhaps 3 is too frequent, and certainly a lot of work-- I've never managed to reformat as frequently as I really should, but doing it a couple times a year will really be a noticeable difference. It will fix every problem that happens with the computer, and get rid of all malware.

Downside is of course that you need to spend the time, then, most importantly, reset the system to how you want it from the default installation.

In some sense every 3 months is overkill, but it will make things run faster.

It also really does depend on how you use your computer. I overuse mine in some ways-- filling the harddrives up all the time with tons of video files, running many programs at once, etc.

It's totally up to you, but I am positive that reinstalling your OS will always boost the performance, some.

jscheuer1
12-04-2007, 10:58 PM
No one could ever accurately describe me as someone who doesn't use their computer much. I think that in about 25 years spanning about 5 computers I've reformatted 3 times, if that.

But I do not load up my system with tons of things I may only want to use once or twice. I try things like that out one at a time, removing those that do not pass muster before moving on to the next thing.

Reformatting (though a bit like using a sledgehammer to kill a mosquito) is a possible way to deal with the detritus that computers can accumulate, but I find it a much more efficient use of my time to deal with the detritus directly, and/or to not accumulate it in the first place.

Having a fast processor and larger than needed HD don't hurt. Even with these, things will pile up if you let them.

djr33
12-04-2007, 11:47 PM
No one could ever accurately describe me as someone who doesn't use their computer much.You're an exception for another reason, that being that you are extremely careful and you know how to fix problems as they arise for anything that does (rarely) get beyond the security you've setup. For the average user, that isn't the case.

And, I bet you'd find it would go faster if you did reformat ;)

Also note, though, that you don't use your computer in the way that some do-- such as gamers who fill their hard drives with game files and run their processors all the time, etc., and video editors (like me) who have tons of media files floating around.

Web design and programming are certainly advanced computing, but not necessarily the most tolling on a system.

jscheuer1
12-07-2007, 05:18 PM
And, I bet you'd find it would go faster if you did reformat ;)

The time involved couldn't possibly be worth it to me unless I had lightning fast backup and restore. The time it would take me to back things up, reinstall, reconfigure to my satisfaction, would far outweigh any slight performance boost it might net me. The current computer is over 2 years old and still performs as fast, or faster than when I first got it.

This current box is so good about these sorts of things that I rarely even need to reboot it, on average, I think once or twice a week, let alone reformat it, sheesh! Generally, when I'm not using it, I just put it into hibernate mode and let it go on battery.