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View Full Version : gif animates way too fast



kissa
08-07-2007, 02:38 AM
http://i18.tinypic.com/4kvx75u.gif

this is the gif i made. it animates WAY too fast, as you can see. the program i'm using (gifmation) allows me to slow down the bps but it seems to only have effect while still in the program, not on the internet.

how do i slow it down?
i have adobe photoshop cs2 v9.0.2 by the way, if there's anything i can do with that.

thanks.

djr33
08-07-2007, 02:54 AM
ImageReady (bundled with PhotoShop) should help.

You can adjust the delay per frame in gif images. I'm not sure why gifmation doesn't save this. Maybe you need to find a checkbox such as "apply time delays" or something when exporting. I wouldn't know.

Most gif animation programs should allow this, so you should be able to find freeware if you can't figure it out in either.

Sliight
08-07-2007, 05:59 AM
I started reading this post 10 minutes ago. At least I think it was about 10 minutes. I started watching the gif animation, and next thing I know I was waking up on the floor. I believe it's very dangerous, please slow it down asap!

jscheuer1
08-07-2007, 06:39 AM
You want to be adjusting the fps (frames per second) or the display time for each frame, currently it is set to 0ms per frame. The bps is most likely to do with the quality of the image or the length of time required to download it at various connection speeds. Here it is at 50ms/frame.

http://home.comcast.net/~jscheuer1/side/4kvx75u.gif

techno_race
09-15-2007, 05:43 PM
currently it is set to 0ms per frame
How is that even possible? :confused:

djr33
09-16-2007, 01:24 AM
It would be some odd blur of all of the images, unchanging, if so, I suppose.
However, it clearly isn't possible, so it would just display as fast as possible-- no delay, hence why it seemed his/her program wasn't applying the delay settings.

Also, there's really no point in bumping a thread over a month old...

jscheuer1
09-16-2007, 06:32 AM
How is that even possible? :confused:


It would be some odd blur of all of the images, unchanging, if so, I suppose.
However, it clearly isn't possible, so it would just display as fast as possible-- no delay, hence why it seemed his/her program wasn't applying the delay settings.

Also, there's really no point in bumping a thread over a month old...

Well, it might be of interest. 0ms per frame is what the image said it was in animation shop after I downloaded it and loaded it into that program. Technically speaking, at that rate, it should be a blur, but obviously it is not. This perhaps has to do with CPU's not being able to actually process the byte stream that quickly. It could be something else.

In any case, once the frame rate is changed to 50ms per, you can easily see the animation rate has slowed.

techno_race
09-16-2007, 03:26 PM
Also, there's really no point in bumping a thread over a month old...
:o ...it was on page 1...

Maybe 0ms means something like 999ns... hmm... Maybe that 6 GHz, 64 GB RAM computer I was discussing earlier could handle it... :p

djr33
09-16-2007, 03:41 PM
It's impossible to read without any delay. It would just flash really really really fast, perhaps fast enough that to the human eye it would be the same.

techno_race
09-16-2007, 03:52 PM
999ns isn't no delay, just a short one. :p

jscheuer1
09-16-2007, 05:27 PM
I thought about this a little more. If the frame rate were truly 0 time per frame, no frames should be seen at all.

djr33
09-16-2007, 06:05 PM
Well, not exactly.

30 fps is standard video. 15 fps gets jumpier. 1 fps would be very slow. 0 fps would be ... no frames every second.
In that sense, yes.

However, gifs are weird. They use a delay, rather than per second time. As such, that's 0 ms delay before the next frame.

Rather than it being multiplied by 0, it's more like dividing by zero. So.... either error (as is the case), or an infinite rate of change-- in essense, it would display all at the same time... then crash :p

jscheuer1
09-17-2007, 03:54 AM
But it is obvious that neither is happening. A true 0 time per frame would be black (the absence of color on a PC/Mac), if the dimensions of the image were rendered.

djr33
09-17-2007, 04:41 AM
Still, this isn't time per frame. It's delay until the next frame.
Rather than displaying an image for 0 seconds, it will display the image, then wait 0 ms until the next is displayed, meaning that it will display the first, then the next, and the next, and the next, all at once, each 0 ms later than the next.

But, yes, in a practical sense, the computer is unable to keep up or perhaps defaults to a more reasonable value.

jscheuer1
09-17-2007, 04:56 AM
In my program (Animation Shop 3), it is referred to as display time per frame.

djr33
09-17-2007, 04:10 PM
Delay, as in the time before something happens. No time before.... the next frame is shown.