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tech_support
04-11-2007, 09:18 AM
I installed Ubuntu Server a couple of days ago. What did it do?

- It erased my hard disk
- It deleted all my partitions
- It wouldn't start
- It wouldn't log me in
- It didn't recognize my mouse

That just made me never to want to install Linux ever again.

So I got Vista. And it was pretty good except it kept on asking me if I wanted to allow things.

Have you ever had any trouble with Linux?

codeexploiter
04-11-2007, 09:22 AM
I was never a linux guy :D

tech_support
04-11-2007, 09:30 AM
I don't get some people when they say 'linux is good. use it.' or 'I hate Windows so I'll use Linux.'

Linux is a much more technical operating system, and I'll give 1/10 for user friendliness.

Twey
04-11-2007, 10:51 AM
- It erased my hard disk
- It deleted all my partitionsI suspect it probably presented you with a partition manager, and you did that yourself :) I can't speak for the other two, since you didn't give any details.
Linux is a much more technical operating system, and I'll give 1/10 for user friendliness.In regards to the partition manager, have you ever tried to do anything complex with Windows? Windows:Doesn't like being installed on extended partitions Must have a partition on the primary hard drive Doesn't recognise partitions in any format other than NTFS or FAT, so if you don't have your entire partition table essentially memorised, you're working blind.Also bear in mind that you were installing a server version. Servers are meant to be operated by technical professionals, not end-users, so the system is probably a lot less user-friendly than an end-user edition of Ubuntu (although I haven't used either version, so I can't say for sure).

boxxertrumps
04-11-2007, 06:26 PM
how much did you read up on the installation process before putting the disks in? You did read the wiki? specifically, this:
https://help.ubuntu.com/6.10/ubuntu/installation-guide/i386/backup.html

thetestingsite
04-11-2007, 06:30 PM
Yes, Ubuntu Server is just command line and to be used by "technical professionals". The other versions of Ubuntu (such as KUbuntu, XUbunu, and some others have a very user friendly Interface. Not to mention that Linux distros pretty much recognize any hardware you add to the computer (such as USB Flash Drives for example), without having to search for/load any drivers for it. Also; that is only the Ubuntu distro that you tried (I suppose), there are literally tons of others out there such as SUSE, Mandriva, Fedora just to name a few.

Hope this helps.

//Edit: Sorry Boxxertrumps, Cross posted.

tech_support
04-12-2007, 02:34 AM
I suspect it probably presented you with a partition manager, and you did that yourself :)

I selected the "use maximum space available" option.


Doesn't like being installed on extended partitions

I've installed it on an extended partition before, it just needs a primary partition to boot (Boot sector)


Must have a partition on the primary hard drive

Really? I'm guessing it's because it needs to boot from it (as said before)


Also bear in mind that you were installing a server version. Servers are meant to be operated by technical professionals, not end-users, so the system is probably a lot less user-friendly than an end-user edition of Ubuntu (although I haven't used either version, so I can't say for sure).

I was trying to install the server version of Ubuntu to setup a web server. Even Windows Server 2003 is more friendlier than this.


how much did you read up on the installation process before putting the disks in? You did read the wiki? specifically, this:
https://help.ubuntu.com/6.10/ubuntu/...86/backup.html

Yep, luckily I did backup all my data.


Yes, Ubuntu Server is just command line and to be used by "technical professionals". The other versions of Ubuntu (such as KUbuntu, XUbunu, and some others have a very user friendly Interface. Not to mention that Linux distros pretty much recognize any hardware you add to the computer (such as USB Flash Drives for example), without having to search for/load any drivers for it. Also; that is only the Ubuntu distro that you tried (I suppose), there are literally tons of others out there such as SUSE, Mandriva, Fedora just to name a few.

I did try to install Fedora 6 Core, but it didn't start up.

thetestingsite
04-12-2007, 02:42 AM
I don't know then, I have tried the following distros and they all worked for me:


Ubuntu Server
KUbuntu
XUbuntu
Fedora 6 Core
Mandriva (don't remember what version)
and OpenSUSE


Not sure what problems you are having with your system (also, on all of these distros you can install and run a webserver).

tech_support
04-12-2007, 02:43 AM
Thanks thetestingsite.

I'll probably try OpenSUSE when I download it.

thetestingsite
04-12-2007, 02:56 AM
No problem. Personally (spelling?) though, I would recommend XUbuntu or KUbuntu as they are the ones that I really enjoy (and see the most "User Friendlyness").

Hope this helps.

Twey
04-12-2007, 10:58 AM
I selected the "use maximum space available" option.Well then.
I've installed [Windows] on an extended partition before, it just needs a primary partition to boot (Boot sector)No, don't confuse the boot sector with a primary partition. The boot sector of the hard drive exists in the "metadata" area, along with the partition table itself.
Really? I'm guessing it's because it needs to boot from it (as said before)It doesn't, though. It uses it to boot from so that Windows is always the first OS to boot. But what if you don't want it to be? What if you want to have, for example, Linux on the primary drive, and have the boot loader chainload NTLDR, which should be on the secondary drive? Or how about having Windows on a portable hard drive? The only way you can do it is to make the Windows drive the primary drive, install Windows, then switch the drives back. There's no reason it should insist on that.
I was trying to install the server version of Ubuntu to setup a web server. Even Windows Server 2003 is more friendlier than this.And? User-friendliness simply isn't (or shouldn't be) a selling point for servers. It's not a consideration, or if it is, it comes well below everything else, like performance, security, stability. Servers are designed for people who are well experienced with the operating system and computers in general, and who understand what they're doing. If you put someone who's completely unfamiliar with Windows in front of a machine and told them to install Windows Server 2003, I suspect much the same thing would happen :)
I did try to install Fedora 6 Core, but it didn't start up.Yeah, the FC6 installer has a bug where it wouldn't install the bootloader properly. I had to do it manually (the install disk doubles as a rescue disk).
I'll probably try OpenSUSE when I download it.Mm, I quite liked SuSE at first, but it didn't offer a whole lot of power. There was a very Windows-esque "the user is stupid" mentality going on. Might be OK for someone starting out, I guess, but I'd recommend KUbuntu over it.
- It didn't recognize my mouseHeh, Windows (XP Pro) didn't recognise my keyboard (a Microsoft Ergonomic, ironically), my wireless card, or my DVD drive. I found it rather hilarious that it actually took eight days to get a hard drive running Windows into a working state, whereas it only took three for Gentoo (where every package was compiled from source). Even now that installation is buggy as anything, I just use qemu.

tech_support
04-13-2007, 04:43 AM
Well then.

Well what? It gave me the details that it was going to split the partition, leaving one for my Windows, and one for Ubuntu.


And? User-friendliness simply isn't (or shouldn't be) a selling point for servers.

Oh yes it should be. How about if you wanted to start of a home server? A media center filled with all your videos from your library on your computer? Parental control? SOHO?

Twey
04-13-2007, 09:25 AM
Well what? It gave me the details that it was going to split the partition, leaving one for my Windows, and one for Ubuntu.Oh, I see, you mean you repartitioned over your Windows partition.
Oh yes it should be. How about if you wanted to start of a home server? A media center filled with all your videos from your library on your computer? Parental control? SOHO?Then you'd probably set up a server on a more user-friendly OS if you lacked the experience to use a dedicated server OS. A server OS is designed for professional servers.

lainlives
04-13-2007, 04:21 PM
if you want user freindly XP Pro accually makes a 'decent' server

i works

tech_support
04-14-2007, 05:17 AM
Then you'd probably set up a server on a more user-friendly OS if you lacked the experience to use a dedicated server OS. A server OS is designed for professional servers.

So, which one would you recommend?

Twey
04-14-2007, 10:15 AM
Fedora (http://fedora.redhat.com/) is currently my favourite binary distro. FC6 has some bugs in the installer, though... you might want to stick with FC5 for now, although FC6 is worth a try if you've got the time to spare.

tech_support
04-14-2007, 10:31 AM
Thanks. I'll wait until FC7 comes out in May then.
Is there a such thing as a Linux Media Center?

Twey
04-14-2007, 10:42 AM
The only real difference between Home and Media Center editions of Windows, as far as I'm aware, is the Media Center application. This functionality (amongst others) is provided by projects such as MythTV (http://www.mythtv.org/).

tech_support
04-15-2007, 04:08 AM
The only real difference between Home and Media Center editions of Windows, as far as I'm aware, is the Media Center application.

Yeah... I know that. But funny thing is, I didn't ask that question :)
But with Vista, the Media Center comes with Home Premium and up (except Business and Enterprise)


This functionality (amongst others) is provided by projects such as MythTV.

Heh. Not very "user-friendly" looking (I mean the start-up interface etc.)

thetestingsite
04-15-2007, 04:13 AM
I would have to say for a "User-Friendly" Server, I would go with either Windows 2000 Server or Windows XP Pro (with IIS). If you wanted to run Apache, then I would suggest Windows XP Pro and install a WAMP server package on it. As for Linux Distros, I would also suggest (as Twey did), Fedora 6.

Hope this helps.

tech_support
04-15-2007, 04:14 AM
I was talking about the media center software: MythTV

But yeah, I'd probably go with Windows SBS Server 2003 or Fedora Core 7, if it supports my hardware.

Twey
04-15-2007, 10:11 AM
Yeah... I know that. But funny thing is, I didn't ask that question :)It was just background information. I've never used Windows Media Center, so I was clarifying what I thought of as the qualifying points for a setup to be considered a "media centre."
Heh. Not very "user-friendly" looking (I mean the start-up interface etc.)I wouldn't know, I haven't used it. There are a few alternatives available if you don't like MythTV, though, such as LinuxMCE (http://linuxmce.com/) (Ubuntu only). I'm not sure how this (http://www.mythtv.org/mythimages/liquidtvmenu.png) looks unfriendly though...

tech_support
04-16-2007, 09:49 AM
I think this looks much better:

http://www.b3ta.cr3ation.co.uk/data/jpg/p4160113.jpg

Twey
04-16-2007, 04:58 PM
Hm, that one would seem to me to be less friendly than MythTV's... the screenshot confuses me more, anyway :p What's with the half-hidden options? And that strange shape under "more tv?"

tech_support
04-17-2007, 07:48 AM
Hm, that one would seem to me to be less friendly than MythTV's...
Haha. Wouldn't look good on my TV though.

What's with the half-hidden options?
It's a fade,slide and enlarge transition.

And that strange shape under "more tv?"
That would be "Online Content" It's a bunch of pictures of websites.

Twey
04-17-2007, 06:07 PM
It's a fade,slide and enlarge transition.Gesundheit :p A what?
That would be "Online Content" It's a bunch of pictures of websites.Ah, kind of a hard to see in that shot...

orhor
05-08-2008, 08:50 AM
http://funnyxperiences.blogspot.com/2008/05/linux-mce.html